Your single job in an interview is to convince the manager that you’re the right person to hire for their job. But how do you convey that you’re a hard worker without drawing from the same over-used well as your competition? Before you simply say you have “good communication skills,” that you’re “a self-starter,” or a “team player who works well with others,” consider more impactful ways to convey your message. Here are 3 things that might work for you.   

  

Tell a Story

It’s human nature to connect through stories. It’s been that way since the dawn of civilization and why our earliest ancestors created oral traditions that passed down through generations. It lives on in the art of books, movies, and television.   

And while you might think that’s irrelevant to a job interview, it’s precisely the opposite. To better connect with the interviewer, you can tap into their human nature and interest in storytelling. Rather than telling them, you’re a hard worker, tell them a story about a time when you worked hard. Make sure this presents the problem, the solution, and the outcome in a relatable and enticing way.   

  

Provide Previous Feedback

We also know that word of mouth is a strong motivator. What do other people say about you as a hard worker regarding your commitment, work ethic, and motivation?

Before your interview, speak with anyone you want to include on your reference list. They can give you some insight before they’re even called by the potential employer. Then add these details to your interview. Tell the interviewer about what your previous boss said about you. Encourage the hiring manager to connect with your references to find out more about your background, skills, abilities, and how hard you work.   

  

Include Data

The third component to better communication during an interview is to include data. Data are the hard facts about your previous experience. Yes, you work hard, but what did that entail exactly? What was the outcome? The more details you can include, the better picture you can paint.   

How did your hard work influence something specific in your last company? Can you equate that with a dollar amount? For example, say that a system you developed ended up saving your company several thousand dollars a month. Without your hard work, the company would have continued to lose money. That’s the kind of data a potential employer wants to know.   

 

Do you want more helpful advice to nail your next interview in 2020? Contact the team at FJC Personnel today.